How to Deal with Writer’s Block When Writing a Novel

Some people claim there is no such thing as writer’s block. They use convincing arguments like there is no such thing as writer’s block because if your a car mechanic you don’t get car mechanic’s block. Or if you work in an office, you don’t show up to work and say “Yo, I don’t have the urge to work today.”

To an extent they’re right.

You shouldn’t wait for a romantic excuse to write. If you only believe you can write in an isolated shack on a beach and you will only write in the evening during a coastal storm while the waves crash across the rocks and winds howl through holes in the shack – well. The conditions will never be right for you to start or continue your project. And you won’t.

Or if you believe you will write the most perfectest words ever at all times, and if any day feels off, you won’t write – your project will lose momentum. Sometimes all you can write is crap and that’s okay.

Find some sustainable writing conditions, like in your room at your desk or at a library, and you’re set. Write when you can, as often as you can. Sure, it’s not super artistic sounding, but you bring the art to the table. Not your surroundings. And you can always fix the words that you write.

However, I believe that writer’s block does exist.
While claiming it doesn’t exist might boost morale, during any creative project, you will encounter times when you get stuck. Sometimes even brutally stuck.

Comparing a creative profession to a noncreative one does not work. For instance, in the case of the car mechanic not having car mechanic’s block, I have to say. The car mechanic doesn’t experience the same issues with motivation for a project.

That’s because the outcome of their project is clear: they want a working car. The steps to get from broken car to working car are probably well defined for them on how to reach that outcome. There is a manual and they might have to order a few spare parts, put stuff together etc.

When you are writing a book: it is not well-defined. You designed the manual. The manual might even be broken too. You have to set the outcome: what is the purpose of your book? And to some extent, you even design the process. There are very few guidelines. You have to invent everything.

Plus, the novel itself is an art. It is abstract. Sometimes how you get from point A to point B is not obvious and a struggle. Sometimes it’s like pulling teeth.

So when you have a block what can you do?

Is your block due to a lack of knowledge about the story or a lack of motivation?

Often times it’s both.

Here are some options you can try to work through a block:

1) Try to keep writing anyway. Write a new section of the book that occurs later (or earlier) than you are working. It just might help you figure out the middle section of the book and what it’s missing.

2) Go back to planning. If you are stuck it might be because you don’t know what happens next, what your character’s need, where you are going in the end.

3) Talk it out with someone. Discuss your story’s structure with a friend. They can help you work it through, or the conversation might reveal something you missed.

4) Revisit your ultimate vision for your book. Why are you writing this book in the first place? What do you want to achieve? At its heart, what is your book about? Does what you are writing meet these goals?

5) Ask someone who will champion your work to read it and give you feedback. They probably will tell you something they like which will increase your confidence.

6) Journal about it. Write about your block and how you feel. Is something in your personal life causing it? How can you work it through? Why are you blocked on a psychological level?

7) Put it down. Take a break and do something else for a week or a few weeks. Start a completely disparate project to clear your mind and come back to the project refreshed and excited. Or maybe you are pushing yourself too hard and need some chill time. This is a great time to read.

8) If you have suffered too many blocks in two short a period of time, perhaps consider pushing through your routine anyway.

9) Evaluate where you went wrong. Did you make a false turn? Is the story boring? Would it be so much better if something drastic changed even though it would screw up everything that you just wrote? If you have an idea pushing at the back of your brain for awhile and you are reluctant to implement it, ask yourself why. Is it because the idea doesn’t work? Or does it work and you are too lazy to rework things?

10) Work through the hard truths. Breathe.

In the end, the block will pass. It’s not worth abandoning all your hard work just because you feel like it’s too hard to continue. You will work through the plot issues. You will figure out how to stay true to the characters. And in the end, the book will be finished.

Because you can do it. You’re the only one who can finish your manuscript.

 

“The Thickety: A Path Begins” by JA White

This is one of these books that changed my entire approach to writing. (Hi, I’m a writer by the way.) “The Thickety” is just brimming with amazing technique. So, here’s what JA White can do:

1) How he introduces his characters. The sentences containing their description are instantly memorable and contain at least one trait that the reader can pick up on and is carried throughout the book (Grace’s ribbon). However, this isn’t what makes it brilliant. The scene introducing the character demonstrates their qualities immediately. You don’t have to guess that Grace is a massive villain because she shows it to you. She prevents the main character from getting medication for her brother in the first scene. What a jerk.

2) The mood and atmosphere is seriously creepy and is maintained throughout the book. The living forest, the paranoid town, the loneliness of the main character, the nethergrim, the addictiveness of spells. I couldn’t sleep after reading this thing. Which may make some people go: this is middle grade? Yes. This pushes the boundaries of horror in middle grade, but seriously, I think kids can handle it. Do you see what’s on TV these days? And lots of children’s classics are scary. Joan Aiken. I loved Joan Aiken when I was smaller and somehow I don’t think it affected me as much then as it does now.

3) The beginning and the ending have serious symmetry. This is honestly what takes this book to masterpiece level. Too often the ending of a book isn’t well-thought out and kills the entire work. Not here. The ending shocked me, yet made so much sense. The entire book had been pushing for this ending so hard that no other ending would’ve worked. Once you read it, you’re like “Oh my god, what? Oh. Of course.”

4) The writing style is very clear. Enough variation in sentence length keeps things interesting. JA White taught me that a two word sentence is okay after some longer sentences and adds colour to a manuscript.

Anyway, even if you’re not a writer this book is a seriously good read. Read it!

But do yourself a favour and keep the lights on.