Kiersten White’s “Paranormalcy” Series

I really enjoyed “And I Darken” and “Now I Rise” from Kiersten White’s recent series, “The Conqueror’s Saga.” In fact, I needed more of White’s writing now. I couldn’t wait for book 3 of “The Conqueror’s Saga” to come out.

Fortunately for me, White has written more books. I gravitated towards her “Paranormalcy” series and read all three books ridiculously fast. Since I read her newest series first, I expected the characters in “Paranormalcy” to be dark and disturbing and the world to be immensely detailed and historical. However, “Paranormalcy” is a completely different beast. Actually, I was glad to read something lighthearted and bubbly for once. Sometimes the darkness in the books I read gets to me and it was a great contrast to meet Evie, the star of this series, who loves boys, pink, and kicking paranormal butt with her taser.

The dialogue throughout the series was hilarious. Evie is both girly and awesome. Too often I meet the female character who is determined to be so tough that she loses her femininity. This is such a common trope these days, it gets tiring. Evie is a great example of how there is nothing wrong with being a girl and liking girl things. She shows that being a girl does not contradict being strong.

Even though the “Paranormalcy” series is cheerful and pokes fun at common paranormal tropes in YA (cough, cough, vampires, cough, cough), it still deals with serious themes. Evie’s faerie ex-boyfriend definitely has some issues with consent and boundaries. These themes play throughout the books, but don’t get too heavy and in-your-face. And, although the evil, sexy faerie trope has definitely made its mark on the YA shelves, “Paranormalcy” is different enough to enjoy. I thoroughly did.

“And I Darken” by Kiersten White

I picked up “And I Darken” thinking it was fantasy. Much to my surprise, it turned out to be more historical fiction. This turned out to be pretty sweet.

This epic novel was inspired strongly by Ottoman and Romanian History, which fascinates me since my education neglected these countries and time periods. However, where the novel really shines are the characters.

The three powerhouse characters are:

1) Lada, the Wallachian ruler’s daughter. She is fierce and vicious, angry and cruel. Strongly independent, she bows for no one – especially men. Sometimes her unlikeable personality made her a difficult character to read about. However, she is placed in difficult circumstances when her family is forced to flee her country. Her father leaves her brother and her in Edirne with the Sultan, as agreement to support the Ottoman Empire. This somewhat excuses her dreadful behaviour. Also, she grows on you.

2) Radu, Lada’s younger brother. He is the most likeable of all the characters. Gentle and empathetic, he always thinks about other people over himself. He is a perfect foil to his violent sister. Although sometimes his softness also drove me crazy, since occasionally his failure to stick up for himself or say what he wants got on my nerves.

3) Mehmed, the third and least favourite son of the Sultan. He values friendship and loyalty, and often has to make difficult choices about who to trust and how to act. His personality really comes out when he interacts with either Lada or Radu. Without them, he is aloof and distant and barely has any personality at all.

These three characters drive the plot. There are some turbulent romantic moments that shine through the brutal betrayals and back stabbing and wars. The religious dialogue is fascinating, but it always comes back to these three. How they interact. How their views contrast. Whether they will support each other or come to blows.

In terms of writing style, the chapters and sentences are short, direct, and clear. Even though the book is fairly large, the pacing is fast.

I’m very much looking forward to reading the next in the series.