Husband-Wife Book Club Reads “My Man Jeeves”


As part of our New Year’s Resolutions, Jason and I decided to start a husband-wife book club. Here are our reviews about the first book on our list: My Man Jeeves by PJ Wodehouse. This time the book was the wife’s pick.

What the wife says:

I chose PJ Wodehouse’s My Man Jeeves because I realised in our entire Husband-Wife Book Club List, we didn’t propose any humour books. This seemed to be a strange omission on our part, so I decided to include one.

Now Jason and I tend to have similar senses of humour. Trying to describe our shared sense of humour is like trying to describe the punchline of a joke. I will say, however, that we can be quite silly, sarcastic, and enjoy good wordplay. We don’t tend to laugh at that random humour that appears in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

Now sometimes Jason’s and my humour diverges. I find that Bloggess post about the giant metal chicken hilarious. And I think any sort of musical humour is great from Weird Al’s Ebay song, to that glorious scene in Back to the Future involving Marty, a tape-player, a space suit, and Marty’s dad.

Jason does not find these things particularly funny.

The big question I had when we were reading My Man Jeeves was: Will Jason find this humour funny or not?

So did he? I’ll let him tell you himself. Stay tuned to hear Jason’s opinion in his own words in his section of the post.

My Man Jeeves is a compilation of eight short stories. Of these, only four involve the boring aristocrat, Wooster, and his clever manservant, the unstoppable Jeeves. These stories were very funny and British.

I don’t want to spoil the stories, but let’s just say when I talked about them with Jason, I was laughing so hard. I particularly enjoyed the story about the girl trying to impress her boyfriend’s ornithologist dad. Jeeves’ solutions to his employer’s problems are unexpected and quirky and usually quite funny too. Usually.

At least, I thought so. What did Jason think? Stay tuned.

Also, I tried to give these Wooster-Jeeves stories a modern interpretation and see if they worked with any homoerotic undertones. When I took arts classes at McGill University, this was all the rage. Superficially, it seems to work since Jeeves does get rather stressed about Wooster’s appearance and fashion sense. On a deeper level, however, it seems to be clear that there isn’t anything going on there. The romance between Wooster and Jeeves is dead, folks.

However, this doesn’t matter in the slightest. These stories don’t require any deeper social commentary. Their purpose really is to amuse.

Now the other four stories in the compilation did not involve Jeeves. Cry. Instead, they described another bloke, Reggie. These stories had predictable plots and weren’t as funny. They relied overused comedy tropes, such as the fat kid who eats too many sweets. Also, the women in these stories really grated on my nerves.

My conclusion: Read the stories featuring Jeeves, skip the rest.

What the husband says:

My Man Jeeves reminds me of Sherlock Holmes with crime replaced by annoying relatives and Sherlock Holmes replaced by Mr. Wooster’s butler, Jeeves.

Emily kept asking whether I found this book funny. Mostly, I didn’t. I did find it amusing in return for his solutions, Jeeves pressures his master not to make supposedly poor wardrobe choices. Amusing isn’t hilarious, however. Jeeves solutions also don’t involve much ingenuity, so when I didn’t find them funny, there was little else in the story to keep me entertained.

The worst stories were those not about Jeeves and Wooster. Although these other stories are told in the style of the rest of the book replete with British slang, I found myself struggling to get through them because the dynamic between Wooster and Jeeves is absent and not replaced by anything comparable.

While I did enjoy parts of the Jeeves stories, and while I’m glad that I finally learned where that now defunct ‘Ask Jeeves’ search engine came from, I won’t be reading any more of them. My suggestion is just to read the first story in the book, and if you find it funny, keep reading. Or keep reading if it’s part of the book club, and hope it’s the last humour book on the list.