“Lord of Shadows” by Cassandra Clare (The Dark Artifices Book 2)

“Lord of Shadows” is enormous at 699 pages. Not that I’m complaining, because I definitely needed this latest Shadowhunter fix. The cast of characters is enormous and includes references and some appearances of my favourites from “The Mortal Instruments” and “Infernal Devices” series as well.

If you are reading Clare for the first time, “The Dark Artifices” series is not the place to start. It builds too much on the “Mortal Instruments” series. Start there, and read your way through.

“Lord of Shadows” builds more on the fairy world, including the Seelie and Unseelie courts. It is very reminiscent of “Wicked Lovely,” where fairies are sexy, dangerous, tricky and evil. Werewolves and vampires barely show, but I didn’t mind. The fairies are pretty interesting and anytime a deal shows up, you know the Shadowhunters will get the short end of the stick.

As always, the relationships shine in this novel. The Shadowhunter world is dominated by who they love and why they love them. Many ships will sail in this series. Many. Sometimes I wish the emphasis wasn’t just on who wants to date who, but it’s interesting and addictive. 😛

Emma and Julian’s relationship where they have forbidden parabatai love confuses me. I understand that parabatai are supposed to fight together and have a strong bond of friendship, but not have romantic feelings for each other. I understand that there is a curse if they fall in love. I understand that it’s taboo in Shadowhunter culture. But why Emma refuses to tell Julian all the details about why she can’t love him and pretends to date his brother instead, just… why? This obstacle towards them making their relationship official doesn’t quite work.

I really liked Christina, Kieran, Mark love triangle. How will be resolved in the future? I need to know.

“Lord of Shadows” has lots of diverse characters. Some are from different cultures, some have disabilities, many are LGBTQ. I really like the inclusiveness of the series and of Clare’s work in general. With a cast this size, I sometimes find it difficult to know all of the characters, but when I do get to know them, I generally like them.

Also, the latest threat in “Lord of Shadows” is a group of racist bigots trying to dominate the Clave and wipe out people who are different, like the Downworlders. Take of that what you will.

The more I read about Clare’s world, the more complete it seems. So much so, that when I’m finished I feel like I could buy a plane ticket to Idris.

If only. 🙂

 

“The Novice” by Taran Matharu (Summoner book 1)

Taran Matharu’s “The Novice” took me by surprise. Fletcher, a blacksmith’s apprentice, discovers he has a talent for summoning demons and after a nasty brawl with the village bully, flees his home forever. Soon enough, he is directed to summoning school and meets a diverse group of peers.

Although “The Novice” does have typical fantasy tropes, including a magic school, demons, and creatures from middle earth, it turns them into something refreshing.

If you like your fantasy to contain lots of world building, “The Novice” does not disappoint. Much of the dialogue revolves around discussing every detail of every demon and the culture of dwarves and elves, two species living often in conflict with humans. Often these descriptions become longwinded and the plot comes to a standstill. However, I didn’t really mind due to some unusual political commentary.

“The Novice” deviates from the norm in fantasy and frequently discusses race relations and inclusion. There are clear parallels between the dwarves and Sikhs. The message opportunities for foreign or disadvantage communities in education is clear. The only elf and dwarf in the summoning school encounter challenges due to discrimination and prejudice.

The hero Fletcher provides the reader with a role model. He never discriminates, although his peers can be cruel to elves and dwarves. He asks the elves and dwarves polite and curious questions about their culture and breaks down cultural barriers.

Compared to the racist nature of his peers, Fletcher’s open attitude seems to be an anomaly. And this was my small problem with the characters – there are very few morally grey situations. Either people are horribly racist or extremely politically correct.

Also, I’m curious about the main villain in the book – the orcs. They also are their own race with their own culture. And yet, dwarves, elves, and humans are convinced they are pure evil. (Although the summoning school investigates some of the orcs’ summoning practices.) Hopefully, this will be addressed in the next two books in the series.

I liked “The Novice” a lot. Often literary lovers complain that fantasy is pure escapism and “The Novice” definitely challenges that statement. Although, the demons are pretty cool and the final battle is epic, so if you’re looking for escapism the “The Novice” delivers that as well.

“The Boy’s Manual to being a Proper Jew” by Eli Glasman

This book deals with religion and sexuality in a painfully honest, nothing held back kind of way. Even though the narrative follows Yossi, gay Jewish boy living in Melbourne, and how he reconciles the restrictiveness of his religion with accepting his sexuality, this book is far from regional Australian fiction. “The Boy’s Manual…” leads to universal questions:

Why does religion often spread hate instead of love?

Why is God so concerned with who you love instead of what kind of person you are and how you treat other people? Homosexuality seems a rather pale sin in comparison with discrimination and exclusion.

Why are religious institutions so set on shaming people for genetic traits they cannot control?

How does practicing the religion in question deviate from the relevant religious texts?

If you deviate from your culture, will you still be supported by your friends and family? What is the cost of being yourself? Do the benefits outweigh these costs?

Needless to say, this book really made me think. In a good way.

As someone who attended a big gay United Church as a teenager, I have seen many facets to religion. I have seen a gay minister ordained and a lesbian couple have their son baptized. However, I also have seen a university Christian group refuse to answer publicly their stance on homosexuality. They insisted that the student contact them privately – no doubt because they weren’t accepting.

It’s funny, because religion creates a sort of paradox. By being part of a religion you are necessarily separating yourself from others, even if the goal of the religion is to treat others well. Can an religious institution ever be fully inclusive and still be classified as practicing that religion?

I’m not sure. But I know you don’t have to be Jewish to ask these questions.