How to Manage Carpal Tunnel as a Writer

Just a quick disclaimer before we start this post: I’m not a doctor and my tips should not replace medical advice. Anything that I say is purely anecdotal. That said, I’m writing this post in case anything that I’ve discovered over the years helps someone with a similar condition.

One of the most annoying things that can happen to a writer when they’re in the middle of a manuscript and making good progress is bam! They’ve been writing for six hours straight and then they’re stuck with a repetitive stress injury that lasts for years. Yep. I’m talking about carpal tunnel. It hits, it sticks and then your wrists may never feel the same.

To say the least: it sucks.

Of course, the first step when you feel this kind of pain is to seek medical attention. The doctor or physiotherapist can tell you what kind of activities you can do with your hands (spoiler alert: they’ll probably tell you to rest) and get you back on track.

However, what can you do after you’ve followed their advice and rested? What should you do when you’re allowed to write again? How can you avoid a relapse?

1) Start to write gradually. Set a timer for a few minutes. Type. Then stop and rest some more. If you write for many hours, the pain may come back. If you feel okay after a long rest, start the timer for another couple of minutes. Type again. Slowly build up your typing time over many weeks.

Even now when my wrists are doing very well, I break after an hour of writing. If I want to write more than one hour, I hold one writing session in the morning, take a break for lunch, and then have another writing session in the afternoon.

2) Mix it up. Consider doing a mixture of typing and hand writing. Again, take lots of breaks.

3) Heat your room during your writing sessions. My apartment has poor insulation and is quite cold. I find if I use a space heater, my wrists don’t seize up during my writing sessions. Also, dipping your hands in hot water can help loosen them.

About ice. I know some people respond well to ice, so if that’s you go ahead. However, I find that ice makes my hands tighter and then my pain gets worse. I tend to prefer heat over ice. But that’s me. You do you.

4) Buy an ergonomic keyboard. I bought the Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard and Mouse. Although sometimes I still get pain, it’s a lot less. I find the keyboard position is better for my hands and has more natural spacing between keys. The mouse is pretty nice too.

I would recommend this product for people with with wrist pain, because it’s definitely worth a try. It also works with Macs. I can’t comment on other ergonomic keyboards on the market, because they aren’t sold at Officeworks in Australia. I tried shipping some stuff over from amazon, but it was wildly unsuccessful.

(By the way, this isn’t an add. This is my own opinion. I’d love to have gotten a discount on my keyboard, but this really didn’t happen. Still, the price was definitely worth the reduction in pain.)

5) Remember to stay active. If you are a writer, you probably like to sit at your desk for long periods of time. It’s important to work out the rest of your body, because if you suffer from carpel tunnel you may have a greater likelihood of acquiring other repetitive stress injuries. Keeping your body strong may help reduce your chances of injuring yourself as well as improve your general health.