“City of Bones” by Cassandra Clare












I’ve listened to Cassandra Clare’s “City of Bones” audio book three times in the past three months as I fall asleep. I’ve also awoken in the middle of the night to a scream of “JAYCE!” with the headphones still dangling from my ears. This doesn’t mean I find the book so boring that it puts me to sleep. Nothing could be farther from the case!

And the reviews on Goodreads seem to agree with me. People just can’t put this book down. I recommended it to someone a while ago, and she still can’t take it out of the public library because the demand is so high – and this book was written in 2007 peeps! That’s some serious staying power.

Although, I’ve read some scathing reviews on Goodreads about this book too. Anything from Clary being a Mary Sue character to “City of Bones” being a blatant Harry Potter rip off to the similes being too frequent. The truth is: I don’t care.

“City of Bones” works. It works so well that I am willing to listen to it time after time again. And that is testament to something that is pretty kick-ass.

So why is “City of Bones” so awesome?

This, my friends, is why:

1) The characters. You walk away from “City of Bones” thinking something along the lines of “why is Simon so annoying?” “Will Jayce and Clary ever end up together?” “Why can’t Alec just accept that he is gay and Jayce is straight?” “Could Jayce be gay? That’d be kinda hot.” “I wish I could be as badass as Isabel.” “Why isn’t Clary as badass as Isabel? Girl, get with the Shadowhunter program!!!”

2) The relationships. You become seriously invested in who ends up with who, and the betrayals, man. The betrayals.

3) The setting. Urban fantasy works on so many levels, because wouldn’t it be nice if this world right now contained magic and demons and warlocks and shadowhunters and possibilities? The reader sees themselves in Clary’s world right away. Urban fantasy takes “what if” to a level grounded in reality.

4) The action. “City of Bones” has a nice amount of fighting where the stakes are high.

5) Jayce. Is. Seriously. Hot. This books also is clearly inspired by anime with the whole demon fighting bad boys type thing. I don’t know what it is about the bad boy character, but jeez can they work the dialogue. I actually laughed more than once when listening to this book the first time. Also, the dialogue itself is excellent as a whole.

So, without trying to spoil this book too much, where does it fall flat?

The whole middle section involving a rat goes on for too long. Also, the big twist at the end that may remind you of Star Wars – you’ll know what I mean when you read it – nearly stopped me from reading the rest of this series. However, the desire to know what happened next trumped the annoyance with the plot and I did read the rest of the books.

In conclusion, I think virtues of “City of Bones” far out way its flaws and that it is worth a read for its dialogue alone.

“Dream On” by Kerstin Gier (The Silver Triology)

I greatly enjoyed German author Kerstin Gier’s Ruby Red Trilogy, and since her most newly translated series has hit the shelves, I’ve been reading them avidly. Fans of Ruby Red, the Silver Trilogy doesn’t disappoint!

What if you could travel the dream world while asleep and enter other people’s dreams? The Silver Trilogy takes lucid dreaming to a whole new level.

“Dream On,” the second book in the Silvery Trilogy carries out the whimsical themes of the dream world and the absurd humour that is so typical of Gier to perfection. Even though I enjoy my books dark like my soul, Gier’s writing has a lightheartedness to it that I truly appreciate.

Liv and her sister Mia make a hilarious duo as they adapt to living with their mother’s new boyfriend and his two teenage kids. Add a crazy extended family tea party to the mix and you have a very believable family dynamic which definitely made me laugh.

The nasty school gossip blogger, Secrecy, also makes a nice commentary on cyberbullying. The interlude of blog posts in between chapters is a funny and sarcastic summary and I’m still trying to guess which character is the blogger’s identity!

Also, Liv’s boyfriend Henry is equal parts cute and mysterious. The second book definitely leaves you wondering why he is so private about his home life and why he won’t reveal what he’s up to. I guess we’ll have to read the third book to find out.

My one complaint, and this is typical of second books in series, is that the threats in the dream world did not seem overly threatening. With Anabel behind bars, the new villain isn’t quite as harrowing, but still towards the end it did turn into quite the page turner. Also, I was left with a lot of questions, but as I’m sure the third book will reveal all, I guess I have to wait to discover the answers!